The Lord’s Day

The Lord’s Day is no longer held in high esteem in America as it once was. In past times, businesses closed on Sundays, in many cases by law (blue laws) that recognized the Biblical principles of Sabbath law. Some parts of the United States still uphold such laws (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_law), but most do not. How should today’s believers view the Lord’s Day?

The Bible addresses the Sabbath in many places. Christendom has long held that Christians are not bound to the Saturday Sabbath of the Old Covenant, but the substance of the Sabbath Law now applies to Sunday, the Lord’s Day. The shift to Sunday recognizes the profound significance of Jesus resurrection on the first day of the week (Sunday – Luke 24). The transference of Sabbath principles to the Lord’s Day recognizes the deep importance of the eternal principles of the Sabbath Law.

The Sabbath principles include:

Resting from one’s ordinary work (Exodus 31:15, 35:2; Deut 5:14; Heb 4:9;Isa 58:13-14)

Worshipping (convocation) (Lev 23:3-4)

Feasting and fellowship (Lev 23:2-4)

Doing good (Mt 12:9-14)

Love the Lord’s Day (Isa 58:13-14)

The few references given above should be enough to steer one into a study of each of these principles.

As Christian’s, we should endeavor to understand the great importance of these principles, and to put them into practice in our own lives. At Shepherd King we gather for Lord’s Day services, and share a meal together after each service. Our aim is to actively love God through worship, to love one another through fellowship and sharing a meal together, and to regularly encourage one another to good works. In doing these things, we come to love the Lord’s Day and enter into the true rest He intends for us.

Posted in Doctrinal